Digital Citizenship – Keeping Safe Online

I wrote an article for the Te Kura June 2013 Link Up magazine (see page 18) on digital citizenship. This magazine goes out to students and whānau.

The article is cross-posted here.

 

Digital citizenship: Keeping safe online

If you use the Internet, mobile phones and other devices, you are responsible for how you conduct yourself online. You are a digital citizen.

A digital citizen needs to:

  • Use technology appropriately
  • Respect and protect themselves
  • Respect and protect others
  • Respects and protects intellectual property.

How can I keep my children safe online?

Children and teenagers need support and guidance in keeping safe online and acting responsibly. Communication is key. Children need to feel comfortable that they can talk to you about what is happening online without being judged. Monitoring what your children are doing online is important, but it is not about spying on them. These simple suggestions might help you and your children feel more comfortable:

  • Make sure that your children have access to the computer or devices in an open space—not behind the closed door of their bedroom.
  • Sit down regularly with your children and discuss what they have been doing online.
  • Let your children know that they can talk to you if something happens online where they feel uncomfortable.
  • Discuss with your children how they can protect themselves and feel safe online.
  • Talk to your children about the importance of privacy, dignity and their identity. Discuss how what they post now could impact on their future.

How can I keep myself safe online?

It’s not just children that need to keep safe online. Adults also need to conduct themselves in a safe and responsible manner online. So what can an adult do to stay safe online?

  • Think carefully about what you post online. Remember that your children also have to live with the consequences of what you post—that cute photo of your toddler in the bath may not be what they want shared with the world in the future.
  • Remember to regularly check your privacy settings on the websites you visit (eg. Facebook, Twitter, Google accounts etc).

We need to work together to keep ourselves and our children safe online.

For more information about keeping safe online, check out:

Monday Mentions: 11 August 2014

BlogCheck out my favourite blog posts from the past week.

  1. Managing change in your school – What is missing? by Leigh Hynes from the blog Hynessight. This post highlights some of the challenges that come about due to change in a school (or anywhere). If you haven’t considered each of the five parts of change management then stress can easily build amongst staff.
  2. Pond and Copyright: negotiating the waters by Chris South from the N4L Blog. I’m sharing this post for a couple of reasons. Firstly, as Pond continues to develop, it’s useful to know how N4L/Pond is dealing with copyright infringements and what our responsibility as educators is. Secondly, the N4L blog is a useful one to follow to keep up-to-date with what is going on with N4L, the Managed Network and of course Pond.
  3. Five Good Resources for Teaching Digital Safety and Citizenship to Elementary School Students by Richard Byrne from the blog Free Technology for Teachers. Richard shares a range of useful digital citizenship resources for you to use with your students.

Parents, children, footprints and tattoos…

Do you know what I like about Facebook? Seeing family and friends sharing what they’ve been up to and the special moments in their lives. While I use Twitter predominantly for professional learning, I use Facebook for keeping up with friends and family. I love seeing photos of families, especially children having a good time. I share them too so that grandparents and aunts and uncles who live in other cities and countries can join in and enjoy with us these special moments.

It’s great that we can do this! Barriers such as distance have been broken down.

But what are we setting up for our children? No longer do we have albums on bookshelves at home which we share with family and friends when visiting, but now we have albums stored online. They might be secure (although I’m not convinced anything on Facebook is really secure especially when they regularly change their privacy/security rules and settings), but as a colleague of mine pointed out one day, by sharing pictures of our children we are creating not only our digital footprint but theirs too. We’re starting something that they have no control over. Is it a privacy issue?

We could be developing the digital footprint/tattoo for our children before they’re even born. What opportunities does it give them to control what, how and with whom they share things with?

Just something to think about…

Facebook and friends…

I’m amazed how many messages that come through on Facebook that say ‘don’t follow this person’ as they are hackers or whatever.

I decided it was time we shared a positive and I think sensible message so I created this image and shared it on Facebook. It’s nothing spectacular but I think it gives a better message than ‘don’t follow’.

staysafe1